CBD: A legal and regulatory update

Over the past few years, cannabidiol (CBD) has become a household term. Moms, dads, brothers, sisters and even grandparents know what CBD is. At the least, they have probably heard of it. Cannabis sativa L. is a plant that includes both marijuana and hemp. CBD is a naturally occurring cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant. Hemp has a much lower concentration of delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive chemical found in high amounts in marijuana.

On Dec. 20, 2018, President Donald Trump signed the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (2018 Farm Bill), changing the landscape for companies involved in the hemp industry. Prior to the 2018 Farm Bill, the 2014 Farm Bill governed the growing and cultivation of hemp in the United States. The 2014 Farm Bill allowed for the growing and cultivation of “industrial hemp,” which was defined as “the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.” The 2018 Farm Bill significantly broadens the definition of “hemp” to mean “the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of that plant, including the seeds thereof and all derivatives, extracts, cannabinoids, isomers, acids, salts and salts of isomers, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.” Notably, the 2018 Farm Bill simply states “hemp” in its definition, rather than “industrial hemp,” and it includes the specific parts of the plant and its chemical constituents.

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