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Joint Health Supplements: Steadily, flexibly forward

As the global joint health market grows a steady 7 percent over the next three years, the category’s staple dietary ingredients and products are giving way to a fresh wave of botanicals and specialty compounds, bringing researched joint and inflammation management to a wider, active audience than those with aging bodies.

Beyond Relief. “Consumers want products that improve their health, not products that mask their symptoms,” explained Tim Hammond, vice president of sales and marketing, Bergstrom Nutrition. In fact, as joint health and function is something consumers want to preserve over a lifetime, they are looking for customized joint health solutions that are safe for long-term use. For many, this means a small, daily supplement dose—but for others, including the younger generations, alternative delivery formats are the way to joint regimen compliance in busy lives.

Herbs on the Rise. Persistent local inflammation is a recognized key driver of wear and tear joint problems, including osteoarthritis (OA). Inflammation is typically a short-term consequence of activities, but chronic or persistent inflammation can have a lasting damaging effect on joints. Turmeric has reached superfood status and is on the rise in joint health, owing largely to its primary anti-inflammatory constituent curcumin. Additional botanical ingredients offering anti-inflammatory and other joint-related researched benefits include ashwagandha, ginger, Boswellia serrataTerminalia chebulaBacopa monnieri and Kaempferia galangal, which has the cool nickname of “resurrection lily.”

Animals to the Rescue. Despite the growing use of botanicals for inflammation and oxidative stress control, joint health still relies heavily on supplying naturally occurring compounds found in cartilage and synovial fluid, which are commonly derived from animal sources. A popular trademark in this category involves collagen, a critical cartilage component. Research has shown undenatured collagen from chicken and collagen peptide ingredients derived from animal skin and bones deliver key amino acids crucial to improving the structure and function of cartilage and connective tissues, including inflammation management. Also, glucosaminoglycans (GAGs) and other compounds found in healthy cartilage are commonly supplemented through popular ingredients like glucosamine and chondroitin from shellfish, but eggshell membrane has emerged as an alternative animal source that also delivers keratin and collagen, as well as anti-inflammatory compounds.

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Dietary supplements for mental performance and protection in athletes and soldiers – slideshow

Athletic and active consumers, including soldiers, are paying increased attention to cognitive health and function, including protection/recovery from brain injury.

Much of sports nutrition focuses on muscles, joints and entire cardiovascular system. However, the brain is the control center, and athletic and active consumers are paying increased attention to cognitive health and function, including focus, attention, memory, reaction time, visual processing, emotions and protection/recovery from brain injury.

This slideshow looks at the potential effects of dietary supplements on the central nervous system (CNS) for improved health and performance. It was developed from the SupplySide West 2018 workshop, “Neurosports: Inside the Brain for Improved Performance.”

Watch The Slideshow HERE

Takeaways: Sports nutrition for female athletes

The world is half female. At least half of the sporting world is female; however, most products are formulated for men or based on research conducted mostly on men.

Women are not small men. They are different anatomically, physiologically, biologically and biochemically. The biggest difference, and one of the primary reasons given for lack of female-specific sports nutrition research, is the menstrual cycle. During certain phases of their cycle, women can experience hormone fluctuations that affect muscles, energy and bone health.

There is tremendous opportunity for companies to capture part of this growing category, but it will require an approach that considers and respects the uniqueness of active females.

Research, Research, Research. It is up to brands and manufacturers to request, fund and support increased research on female athletes. Accept and account for challenges from menstrual cycle influences. “The inane idea that women are more difficult or more expensive to study is pure laziness, in my opinion,” said Susan Kleiner, Ph.D., R.D., owner of High Performance Nutrition LLC and nutritionist for many elite female sports teams.

For instance, researchers like Bill Campbell, Ph.D., associate professor of exercise science at the University of South Florida, purposefully does not plan trials around menstrual cycles. “The reason I do not consider the menstrual cycle in my studies is that I like to be able to extrapolate my results by saying that the outcomes were irrespective of the female’s menstrual cycle,” he explained.

More companies, such as sports nutrition brand Dymatize and ingredient supplier Bergstrom Nurition, are funding studies on females. Abbie Smith-Ryan, Ph.D., associate professor of exercise physiology and director of the Applied Physiology Lab at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, who also conducts studies on females, reported NIH now requires researchers to justify why they are or are not including women in their research proposals.

Read The Full Article HERE

The plant-based protein market — deep dive

In the past decade, products made with plant proteins have evolved to include a wide variety of flavors, textures and formats for every eating occasion. A broader range of consumers now seeks plant-based protein goods, particularly consumers under age 40 who eat meat but are incorporating other options. Dairy alternative, sports nutrition and snacks are some of the top categories for plant-protein products, drawing from sources such as soy, pea, lentil and ancient grains.

Takeaways for your business

• Taste is the top reason for eating plant proteins, far outranking concerns about environment or diet.
• 46% of consumers surveyed believe plant-based proteins are healthier than animal-based counterparts.
• Convenience foods, prepared breakfast items, frozen prepared foods and entrées show great potential.

Read The Full Article HERE

Are There Too Many Supplement Brands?

If you spend any amount of time around industry events or targeted social media pages, you have likely heard…

“There are way too many brands today!”

…from brand owners, brand employees, retail shop owners, and every other stakeholder in the industry.

So, is there actually too many nutritional supplement brands?

I mean it certainly feels like it. Regardless if you are a stakeholder that looks at the industry from a science or marketing side, they both have been infiltrated by this proliferation in brand creation in the last 5 years. This has been caused by low barriers of entry in both national distribution (direct to consumer and Amazon) and national marketing (social media). This causes a slew of competition that creates noise and spikes different market economics.

Feel is one thing but what about the facts. Lets look at the economics definition of market saturation.

Market saturation is when sales of a product (or service) has reached the point that customer needs have been met. The term implies a situation in which sales growth is unlikely.

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Getting Ahead of the Curve: Consumers Seeking Specialty Nutritionals

As the variety of supplements, functional foods, ingredients, and bioactives continue to diversify to meet an ever more sophisticated list of health/wellness issues, it’s not surprising that
consumers are beginning to worry if they’re getting enough of the specialty nutritional ingredients they perceive important for their needs.

While 20% of adults don’t think they get enough basic vitamins/minerals, even more consumers—30% of gen Xers, 27% of millennials, and 24% of adults overall—don’t believe they get enough specialty nutrients, according to FMI’s 2018 U.S. Grocery Shopper Trends. Women (26% vs. 20% of men) are more likely to be concerned about their intake of specialty nutrients; one in five boomers and 16% of matures.

After vitamins/minerals, specialty supplements are the most used category of dietary supplements, taken by 51%; followed by herbals/botanicals (41%), sports nutrition (32%), and weight management supplements (20%), according to the Council for Responsible Nutrition’s2018 Consumer Survey on Dietary Supplements.

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Ad spend in the dietary supplement category

Advertisers have spent nearly US$900 million on vitamin, mineral and supplement products over the past year, including $239 million on advertisements for vitamins and minerals and $640 million on advertisements for nutritional supplements, according to Kantar Media’s 2018 MARS Consumer Health Study. The study also reviewed digital and connectivity trends among consumers, coinciding with higher digital ad spend in 2018 compared to 2013.

View The Infographic HERE

The relationship between sleep aids and stress management

Sleep aids are rapidly growing in popularity across the globe, posting a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 6.5 percent between 2012 and 2017 to reach retail sales of US$2.3 billion in 2017, according to market research firm Euromonitor International. Driven by an increasingly stressed and sleepless consumer base, particularly in the developed world, sleep aids are expected to continue growing through 2022.

Stress and sleep management are essentially one in the same when looking at consumer response: lack of sleep leads to increased stress, which results in an increase in reported sleeplessness. As a stressed consumer base turns to over-the-counter (OTC) sleep aids for relief, products positioned to address both conditions will continue to grow in popularity.

Sleep Aids Among Fastest-Growing OTC Categories

Though retail sales of sleep aids amounted to just $2.3 billion in 2017—far below cough, cold and allergy remedies, which is the largest OTC category—sleep aids experienced strong growth over 2012-2017, second to emergency contraception, which posted a CAGR of 9.4 percent over the same period. Looking forward, sales of sleep aids are expected to post a CAGR of 2.6 percent globally through 2022, according to Euromonitor.

Sales of sleep aids are heavily affected by demographic and epidemiological factors, particularly in the developed world as consumers increasingly report higher levels of work- and family-related stressors as well as a decline in number of hours slept each night. As stress levels continue to increase, consumers will likely continue to turn to OTC sleep aids for relief.

Increasing Stress Levels

The most common sources for consumers’ increasing stress levels are their jobs, familial obligations and, often, pressure from peers or society to work harder and accomplish more to achieve perceived success. Surveys of consumers’ attitudes toward work/life balance and stress management activities indicate across global markets (though largely excluding the developing world), consumers report being more stressed and under more perceived pressure in 2016 than in previous years, and there is every reason to believe these attitudes will persist and strengthen in the coming years as well.

Since the market for sleep aids is tied so closely to stress management, any discussion of retail sales of products to promote sleep must necessarily include a discussion about the psychological health of the consumer base and their motivations for buying sleep aid products in the first place.

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Body boosting ingredients for the serious athlete

Branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are incredibly popular with hardcore athletes and body builders. BCAAs include leucine, isoleucine and valine, which are essential amino acids that humans only get from food and beverage because the body doesn’t make them on its own. Among the benefits of BCAA products  are stimulation of muscle protein synthesis (MPS), prevention of muscle breakdown and delaying of muscle fatigue.1

There are hundreds of BCAA products on the market, and some of the most popular brands include Cellucor, BPI Sports and Dymatize. BCAA supplements are most often sold as powders with sweet and citrus flavors, but brands such as Optimum Nutrition and Scivation have developed ready-to-drink (RTD) beverages, as well.

Collagen is the most abundant protein found in the human body and is the basis of connective tissues that help give structure to tendons, ligaments, skin, bones and teeth. It is also sold as a supplement in products that are rapidly growing in popularity. The ingredientworks with endogenous hyaluronic acid (HA) to improve joint health,2 enhance hair,3 skin4 and nails.5 As a bonus, it may also help repair muscle tissue, although whey and casein are generally regarded as more effective for that purpose.6

The source of the collagen isn’t quite so sexy. It comes from animals such as cattle, fish, turkeys and chickens, which means it is not vegan and can cause issues with a product’s kosher status. Allergenic concerns also need to be taken into consideration for sensitive consumers. Formulating with collagen can be challenging because it can have solubility issues, but brands such as Eviva Collagen Elixir, Beauty & Go and Pure Gold Collagen have successfully developed RTD collagen supplements. Many collagen protein powders are on the market, as well, including in  brands such as NeoCell, Ancient Nutrition, Vital Proteins and Sports Research.

Micellar casein is an up-and-coming ingredient for active consumers and is generally regarded as the most effective form of casein compared to similar ingredients like calcium caseinate. It is the slowest digested caseinate protein and is a source of high-quality BCAAs and glutamine.

“The mechanism of action is a stark contrast to hydrolyzed whey, which is known for fast-acting, quick absorption into the body,” explained Jason Dompeling, beverage scientist at Imbibe. “Micellar casein is known for very slow absorption. The casein micelles form a sort of ‘clot’ in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that slow down the protein breakdown and amino acid absorption.”

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Probiotics provide a competitive edge in sports nutrition

The gut flora performs a variety of functions that are important for health. In fact, 70 percent of the body’s immune cells are located in the digestive tract, making gut health critical to overall health. A healthy and well-balanced gut flora facilitates digestion, protects against pathogens, provides vitamins and nutrients, and helps form the immune system. For athletes and fitness enthusiasts, optimizing digestion and immunity are major factors as they strive to improve performance. As research advances, probiotics will play a leading role in shaping the sports nutrition supplements of tomorrow.

Athletes and active individuals have high nutrient needs, which are best met when digestion is well-functioning. Healthy bacteria in the gut aid in the digestion of macronutrients, allowing for optimized nutrient uptake from an athlete’s diet. They also aid in the digestion of macronutrients, allowing for optimized nutrient uptake from the diet. Some probiotic strains can play a role in the use of protein for muscle growth and human recovery by promoting the absorption of key amino acids. Being able to absorb more of the amino acids from protein can help increase muscle growth. In addition, probiotics can support immune health by adhering to the gut epithelium, thereby enhancing the “gut barrier” function of those cells by preventing the adhesion of pathogens.

Working out is all about breaking down and rebuilding muscles to become stronger and faster. With such activity, inflammation and free radical production are normal, expected and necessary—but the body’s response to these reactions will determine how quickly an athlete can recover and get back to his or her regimen. The two main areas of focus while doing strenuous activity are providing the right nutrients to build muscle (protein) and recovery (reduced inflammation). Probiotics can help in both of those areas; for example, the strain Bacillus subtilis DE111® (from Deerland) produces many enzymes to help break down protein, and recent research supported its role in reducing markers of inflammatory compounds that arise during exercise (Sports. 2018;6[3]:70).

According to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), there are more than 480,000 NCAA student athletes who compete in 24 sports every year. And of course, this is only a slice of the physical-competition pie. Add professional sports, athletic trainers and serious fitness enthusiasts like marathoners and cyclists, and the number of individuals who could benefit from probiotic supplementation is significantly higher.

Read The Full Article HERE

 

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