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Krill oil research shows benefits to athletes

Krill oil research shows benefits to athletes

Exercise takes many forms, varying from person to person. From dedicated athletes and bodybuilders to frequent and even infrequent gym goers, the sports nutrition market is on the move, rapidly changing to meet the needs of every type of active lifestyle. Personalized nutrition is not new; in fact, it’s a topic that continues to reign. The “one size fits all” approach is out. Consumers can choose from tailor-made products and programs that fit their needs and preferences, and that is true for the sports nutrition space.

Consumers (and athletes) are savvier when it comes to supplements, and they are becoming more educated on nutritional values, ingredient makeup and dosage rates. Companies that operate in the natural products space need to innovate regularly and offer invaluable and unique products. Standing out in the heavily saturated sports nutrition market is not easy. The sports nutrition market is competitive.

Omega-3s are essential for maintaining and supporting cardiovascular,1 brain,2 eye,3 and more,4 but they also provide health benefits for sports nutrition. Having optimal omega-3 levels (8 percent or higher as assessed by the Omega-3 Index method) is particularly important for athletes since they are already at higher risks for health issues due to their intense physical activity.5

Krill oil power

Omega-3 supplements are plentiful in today’s market, but krill oil, an increasingly popular option, is a unique omega-3. Krill oil is gentler on the stomach and doesn’t produce fishy burps like other omega-3 options.6 Combined with a better delivery method, the bio-efficiency and stability of krill oil supplements allow for smaller, easier to swallow pills with less daily dosage requirements.

Krill oil comes from the Southern Ocean and occupies a low level in the food chain. It is also minimally processed and doesn’t contain additives or preservatives.

From a health benefits standpoint, krill oil is an interesting omega-3 option because its fatty acids are largely bound to phospholipids, which are integral to the body’s cells and cell membranes. Phospholipids are structurally different than omega-3 triglycerides, which are found in fish and algal oils, and this difference is crucial because it dictates how eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are delivered in the body. Omega-3s that are carried by triglycerides require a conversion in the liver to enter the bloodstream, according to Dr. Anne Carol Goldberg, professor of medicine, Washington University in St. Louis. Krill oil’s omega-3s, on the other hand, enter the bloodstream directly by phospholipids, speeding their availability for use in the body.

Read The Full Article HERE

Antioxidant botanicals for joint support

Antioxidant botanicals for joint support

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 52 million Americans suffer from some form of arthritis—that’s 23 percent of the entire adult population. The joint nutraceuticals glucosamine, chondroitin and hyaluronic acid (HA) are agents that work well for joint support, but sometimes more intensive support is needed. Many herbs and botanical extracts have shown great promise in supporting joint health. Studies show a potent blend of these herbal extracts can provide tissue support benefits and relief from minor pain while supporting healthy joints and muscle tissue.

Botanicals can aid in the relief of muscular pain following intense exercise and provide antioxidants to help protect connective tissue from the damaging effect of free radicals. Devils claw extract, Boswellia serrata extract, turmeric root extract, bromelain, green tea, quercitin, grape seed extract, ginger and phellodendron have all been shown to exert a powerful influence for joint support.

Antioxidants are substances that fight free radicals—compounds in the body that can damage cells, DNA and cause cell death.

Green tea contains a high concentration of powerful antioxidants called polyphenols, which can neutralize free radicals and may reduce or even help prevent some of the damage they cause (Cell Biophys. 1989 Apr;14(2):175-85).

Quercetin belongs to a group of plant pigments called flavonoids, antioxidants that give many fruits, flowers and vegetables their color. In combination with other joint botanicals, it has been shown to impact muscle recovery and joint inflammation on tissues compromised by inflammation and its impact on muscle recovery (Nutr J. 2011 Sep 7;10:90. DOI: 10.1186/1475-2891-10-90).

Grape seed extract is one of the richest sources of antioxidants, including proanthocyanidins, that reduces the toxic effects of oxidative stress. Grape seed extract may be as much as 50 times more potent that vitamin E and 20 times more potent than vitamin C as an antioxidant (Int J Mol Sci. 2010;11(2):622-646).

Read The Full Article HERE

Curcumin: Still on the climb

Curcumin Still on the climb

According to SPINS, 2017 sales of turmeric were more than US$4.8 million in U.S. conventional multioutlet stores—a 31 percent year-over-year increase compared to 2016. Additionally, the global curcumin market is expected to reach $110.5 million by 2024, a 137 percent increase from 2016, based on Global Market Insights data. Curcumin continues to climb, though several factors have the potential to impact the success of curcumin products. Consider these key market dynamics affecting the curcumin market.

Popularity & potential. Curcumin is enjoying a nod of approval from consumers seeking its health benefits, namely its anti-inflammatory effects. Natural Marketing Institute (NMI) reported mainstream consumer interest in using nutritional supplements to treat inflammation is on the rise; 30 percent of U.S. consumers were very interested in a supplement to manage or prevent inflammation in the body in 2017 vs. 19 percent in 2009. The anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin translate to several areas of health, with research supporting beneficial effects in cognition, mood and sports nutrition, furthering the reach of this powerful compound.

Ensuring efficacy & quality. Curcumin is challenged with poor bioavailability, which has led ingredient manufacturers and product developers to create solutions that ensure effective curcumin products. Though there are proprietary ingredients and formulation solutions—such as adding piperine to curcumin products—to address curcumin’s bioavailability issues, concern remains surrounding the efficacy of curcumin products. Some researchers, for example, question whether the supporting compounds in turmeric are necessary for curcumin bioavailability. Another challenge for curcumin is the threat of adulteration. The Botanical Adulteration Program reported curcumin has been adulterated with other Curcuma species, starches and dyes. More recently, the addition of undeclared synthetic curcumin or mixtures of synthetic curcuminoids to turmeric extracts has been reported.

Beyond supplements. Turmeric, from which the curcumin compound derives, is an increasingly popular ingredient in foods and beverages. However, food and beverage brands must use caution, as turmeric (and therefore curcumin) has only been approved by FDA as a food colorant and is not recognized for its medicinal properties. Therefore, turmeric should be listed as a coloring agent and not a functional ingredient, which seems like a bit of a grey area considering the many functional products using turmeric on the market.

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Fiber Revisited: Closing the Gap

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On May 27, 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a definition of “dietary fiber” and created a pre-approval system for various isolated and synthetic non-digestible carbohydrates (NDCs). For all food labeled on or after Jan. 1, 2020, the isolated or synthetic NDCs must be determined by FDA to have a physiological effect that is beneficial to human health before they can be counted as dietary fiber for nutrition labeling purposes.

Dietary fiber is now defined by FDA as “non-digestible soluble and insoluble carbohydrates (with three or more monomeric units), and lignin that are intrinsic and intact in plants; isolated or synthetic non-digestible carbohydrates (with three or more monomeric units) determined by FDA to have physiological effects that are beneficial to human health.”

This change has impacted product development in some significant ways.

According to Aouatef Bellamine, PhD, senior science manager, Lonza Consumer Health & Nutrition, Morristown, NJ, the new fiber definition means dietary supplement formulators and manufacturers will need to either adhere to this list of ingredients if they want to make a fiber claim, or petition for their fiber source to be added to the definition.

One company doing just that is Somerville, NJ-based Nexira, which along with representatives of the gum acacia industry, is conducting additional studies to strengthen the evidence supporting the beneficial effects of gum acacia on blood glucose attenuation and energy intake, noted Julie Impérato, marketing manager. After completion of the studies, Nexira is expected to submit a Citizen Petition to FDA in the spring of 2019 to request that gum acacia be recognized as a dietary fiber for nutrition labeling and claims on foods and beverages. “We are hopeful to receive a positive response from FDA by the summer of 2019,” said Ms. Impérato.

Read The Full Article HERE

CBD concentration matters

CBD concentration matters

t’s true cannabidiol (CBD) is a drug. GW Pharmaceuticals went to great effort and expense to determine the clinical benefits of CBD. The specific, single-entity chemical is considered a drug because FDA approved it as one, and that is how the U.S. regulatory system operates. The regulatory system also renders items as drugs based exclusively on what is said about them. Cognitive dissonance occurs with different interpretations of the law, and this dissonance, while remaining unresolved, affords opportunity.

Harvesting CBD from hemp raw material (the botanical that was so much the focus of the passage of the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018, otherwise known as the Farm Bill) is acceptable from a statutory perspective. Hemp products have recently passed through FDA review with a few specific new ingredients (not all) being considered GRAS (generally recognized as safe) for use in foods. The presence of CBD in hemp products additionally renders it consumed in conventional foods. The lack of objection to these hemp product GRAS notifications affirms FDA’s current determination regarding the safety of CBD and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

The question of whether this lack of objection extends to use in dietary supplements is a separate, open issue. Proper notification of CBD products as new dietary ingredients (NDIs) for use in dietary supplements is mandatory unless the article of food (hemp) has not been “chemically altered.” The current thinking from FDA is that just about anything is considered chemical alteration. The draft guidance on NDI notifications, issued in August 2016, clarifies this thinking regarding what results in chemical alteration.

Peak cognitive dissonance occurred when FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., said in a Dec. 20, 2018 statement, “. . . it’s unlawful under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FD&C) to introduce food containing added CBD or THC into interstate commerce, or to market CBD or THC products as, or in, dietary supplements, regardless of whether the substances are hemp-derived.” While FDA did not recently object to three GRAS notices for hemp products that contain trace amounts of both CBD and THC, it simultaneously stated its conclusions do not affect its position in an FDA Q&A on marijuana: It is a prohibited act under federal law “to introduce into interstate commerce a food to which CBD or THC has been added.” This is reminiscent of the similar agency view on the presence of lovastatin in products marketed as red yeast rice supplements and the related regulatory challenges it posed from years past.

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Essential fatty acids health benefits

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Fatty acids belong to a category of biological molecules called lipids (or fats), which are generally water-insoluble but highly soluble in organic solvents. Chemically, a fatty acid is a non-polar long aliphatic hydrocarbon molecule chain that has an acidic carboxylic acid group (COOH) at one end of its molecule, and a methyl group (CH3) at the other end, which is designated omega or ω. The COOH being at one end is what makes these molecules acids. Most naturally occurring fatty acids have an unbranched chain of an even number of carbon atoms (from four to 28). They have the general structure of CH3(CH2)nCOOH.

Fatty acids are derived from both animal and vegetable fats and oils. They are a necessary part of nutrition, and have uses outside the body (such as lubricants, cooking, soaps, detergents and cosmetics).

Fatty acids can be categorized in various ways, although they are primarily categorized through the degree of saturation or variation of chain length.

A saturated fatty acid has no double bonds. Saturated fatty acids are solid at room temperature, have high melting points and are common in animal and plant fats.

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Harnessing the Power of Matcha (Podcast)

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Takeaways

  • Matcha is an 800 year old ingredient
  • It’s uniqueness comes from its color, flavor, and texture.
  • Full of amazing health benefits

What are the health benefits of Matcha?

  • Amazing Antioxidant
  • High in Alkaline
  • Aids in digestion
  • Superfood (By Most Measurements)
  • 30% Protein & Fiber
  • Loaded with Vitamins & Minerals

Where is Matcha Tea traditionally grown?

High quality Matcha is sourced from Japan in the town of Nishio.

What Factors affect quality?

The factors that affect quality are the growing regions, soil conditions, weather conditions, and also the experience of the farmers.

Podcast: Dosage & Delivery Drive Innovation in the Joint Health & Anti-Inflammation Category

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Consumers are seeking out convenient and enjoyable formulas to support joint health and inflammation. Powders, shakes, shots, and ready-to-drink mixes are popular delivery formats in the category, however leading ingredients offering support may not always be conducive to novel delivery systems.

This dilemma led Pharmako Biotechnologies and its exclusive U.S. distributor and partner Gencor to develop innovative bioavailable formulas for the joint health and inflammation categories. In this interview, R.V. Venkatesh, managing director for Gencor, and Eric Meppem, director of Pharmako Biotechnologies, discuss the benefits of bioavailable HyrdoCurc curcumin, as well as Levagen and Levagen+ palmitoylethanolamide (PEA).

Marine Ingredients: Sourcing from the Sea

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Virtually all scientists believe that life on Earth originated in the sea billions of years ago. If one accepts this premise, it comes as no surprise that the sea and other waters of the world continue to produce natural ingredients that enhance health and contribute to an active, vibrant lifestyle.

The first, of course, is fresh water itself, which humans need for drinking and to provide—via evaporation, rain, and irrigation—the moisture needed to nourish vegetation, forestation, and cultivated crops. Within the foreseeable future, it’s possible people will use the salted sea for the majority of drinking water, too, thanks to desalinization efforts around the globe.

Other health-giving substances from the sea include many thousands of varieties of plant and animal matter that grace dinner tables, providing essential macro- and micronutrients. And then there are specialized oils, extracts and more that have become critical components of the marine ingredients segment of the broader nutraceutical industry.

Read The Full Article HERE

A deep look at sleep-promoting ingredients (Podcast)

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Research has shown the many benefits sleep has for every target demographic, but research has not shown that dietary ingredients can cause rid consumers of insomnia or put them to sleep faster. But perhaps, that shouldn’t be the goal of botanicals, vitamins and minerals, according to Michael Grandner, Ph.D., director of the sleep and health research program and an assistant professor in the department of psychiatry in the University of Arizona College of Medicine. Instead, supplements and functional foods help consumers optimize the rebuilding and recovery aspects of sleep. In this podcast, Grandner talks with Sandy Almendarez, editor in chief, INSIDER, about nutrition and sleep, including:

  • Why most consumers are taking melatonin incorrectly
  • How energizing ingredients, such as vitamin B12, can help benefit sleep
  • The problem with current research on dietary ingredients’ ability to promote sleep and where researchers can better spend their time.

This podcast was recorded at the annual conference held by the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN), which was held in Dana Point, California, in October 2018.

Listen To The Podcast HERE

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